Category Archives: Village Buildings

Thatching – the art and craft

This month’s talk is tonight: Tuesday 20th November at 7.30 pm in the Village Hall, King Street. We look forward to hearing Graham Carter, master thatcher from Yaxley, Cambridgeshire,  speak about his craft and a lifetime’s experience of thatching all over the country. 

West Deeping has only two thatched cottages – one in King Street and one in The Lane, but it seems likely that in earlier years there were many more.

A search through the archives produced only a couple of references and a few photographs: in 1781 the accounts of the Overseer of the Poor recorded the sum of 12 shillings and 10 pence paid out for seven days work to  thatch the “Poor cottages” (now 54 – 56 King Street) and in 1864 the Rectory had a thatched stable with adjoining coach house.  Most of the old photographs of the village show tiled or slated rooves, but there are a few survivors

1971 Thatchers bill COPYA more recent archive, less than 50 years old, but nonetheless interesting, is dated 1971. The bill for thatching the cottage in King Street was £204.50 – (just over £2,800 by current values using the National Archives currency converter) .

Graham Carter is sure to be able to tell us about many interesting projects he has undertaken. Come along tonight – maybe you will find out what a ‘yealm’ is and how many go to make a bundle or what the difference is between a ‘leggett’ and an eave dresser!

All are welcome! Refreshments are served from 7 pm, included in the entry price of £2.50.

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A midsummer opportunity to explore Molecey’s Granary and grounds

DJI_0506The Granary on Stamford Road in West Deeping

Date stone 1773

The engraved stone on the gable-end of The Granary records the date of 1773 – which makes 2018 its 245th birthday! This was when miller and baker John Molecey, married to Eleanor, built the granary. It was attached to their watermill which came to be known as Molecey’s Mill, to the east of the village of West Deeping, on the recently-opened Turnpike road, (now Stamford Road) and next to the Welland Navigation, the canal between the Deepings and Stamford.

The current owners, Graham and Glenn,  

invite

West Deeping Heritage Group and friends

 to celebrate this birthday on

Wednesday 20th June 2018

Meet at 6 p.m. at “The Boaty”, between 60 and 66, King Street, West Deeping  – to walk with Graham and Maggie who will be your guides along the former route of the Deeping to Stamford canal, the Welland Navigation.

Or if you do not want to walk – meet at 7 pm at The Granary, Stamford Road, West Deeping, where there is plenty of parking in the paddock.

Bubbles, Bites & Birthday cake will be available!

Please let us know if you are coming –

wdheritage@hotmail.co.uk or text 07808 585189

 

 

Last but not least of our meetings

It’s more than West Deeping Heritage Group’s Annual General Meeting on Wednesday 16th May 2018. After the briefest of meetings, starting at 7.30 p.m. at the Village Hall, there will be an opportunity to have a “Delve into the village archives.”

There’s no charge, the weather forecast for Wednesday is dull and cool and we have many interesting things to show you – so do join us!

We have picked out just some of the archives in our collection for you to look at: IMG_20180515_0001

 – our oldest original documents – including some found by John Watts, a lodger for a short time in the room above the garage of West Deeping Rectory in 1955 when he was lodging there. 60 years later Mr Watts’ daughters Sandra Edwards and Linda Reed of Coventry contacted West Deeping Heritage Group and made the trip to the village to return the package. The oldest is a church warden’s bill from 1758 – for “4 times washen the linin”  he was owed 10 shillings!

– the file of information about village buildings – including all our listed buildings and research on the Figg family and the Moleceys.

Late 19thC school group

West Deeping School pupils in the late 19th century when Mr Mann was the schoolmaster

 – archives for the village school –  from when it was first endowed by Miss Molecey in 1845 and opened in the stone cottages on King Street near the Red Lion. When the new West Deeping Church of England school opened in 1900, the original building became the Reading Room and later was converted into a family home. Most of the school records are at Lincolnshire Archives but we have copies which have been transcribed.  The log book was kept right up to the school’s closure in 1972.

 

– the Archaeology archive, including aerial photographs, maps and photographs of excavations at Rectory Farm starting in the 1990s and copies of talks given to West Deeping Heritage Group by the archaeologists.

and last but by no means least:

–  the “Boaty Archive” – many of the information resources we collected for the Heritage Lottery-funded project on the Stamford Canal.

If there are other aspects of West Deeping’s history in which you are interested or if you have information to share, please get in touch by commenting on this post.

The Tennyson’s Arms – one of West Deeping’s three pubs

West Deeping’s pub, the Red Lion, is well-known; but fewer people remember the George and Dragon and even fewer have heard of the Tennyson’s Arms!

The building is no longer there – it was demolished in the 1940s – and on the site, at the north end of King Street, are now two pairs of semi-detached bungalows built by the council not long after the end of World War 2.

With the help of  various archival resources, but mainly thanks to the memories and photographs of Bernard Roffe, who was brought up at the Tennyson’s Arms, we can piece together some of its history.

Cropped to print

The Tennyson’s Arms, West Deeping – painted by Karl Wood in 1939                                       Courtesy of the Usher Gallery, Lincoln

The Tennyson’s Arms  is the first one to be written up since the page Village Buildings 
was launched.  Follow the link to read the whole article.
Any further information about the Tennyson’s Arms would be welcome from readers.