Category Archives: West Deeping History

“Fresh from the fields” : Rectory Farm Archaeology

Our programme for Autumn 2018 starts off with something special!

Tuesday 25th September 10 am to 4 pm

Rectory Farm Archaeology Day

Thanks to Breedon West Deeping Quarry and PCAS Archaeology Ltd , West Deeping Heritage Group invites everyone to an exhibition in the Village Hall about the Rectory Farm archaeological investigations, on Stamford Road, West Deeping

Look round the display and see examples of the finds, before taking a minibus trip to visit the site itself to the north of Stamford Road– at 10.30, 12.00, 1.30 and 3.00

(Please wear appropriate footwear. Hard hats and high visibility jackets provided)

West Deeping Heritage Group visit to Rectory Farm excavation site 2011

followed at 7.30 pm by West Deeping Heritage Group’s first talk of the season

Simon Savage of PCAS Archaeology Ltd: “Fresh from the Fields: an archaeological update from the Rectory Farm site at West Deeping”

It was 6 years ago that we last heard from the archaeologists about the extensive multi-period landscape in the fields to the north of the village, which has been progressively surveyed and excavated since the 1990s. This important site has revealed evidence of settlement and land use dating from the Neolithic period, including a late Bronze age co-axial field system, Iron age enclosures and a Roman British villa with a bath house.

  • Village Hall, King Street, West Deeping PE6 9HP
  • Refreshments are available from 7 p.m. for a 7.30 p.m. start.
  • Admission is £2.50 at the door.
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Last but not least of our meetings

It’s more than West Deeping Heritage Group’s Annual General Meeting on Wednesday 16th May 2018. After the briefest of meetings, starting at 7.30 p.m. at the Village Hall, there will be an opportunity to have a “Delve into the village archives.”

There’s no charge, the weather forecast for Wednesday is dull and cool and we have many interesting things to show you – so do join us!

We have picked out just some of the archives in our collection for you to look at: IMG_20180515_0001

 – our oldest original documents – including some found by John Watts, a lodger for a short time in the room above the garage of West Deeping Rectory in 1955 when he was lodging there. 60 years later Mr Watts’ daughters Sandra Edwards and Linda Reed of Coventry contacted West Deeping Heritage Group and made the trip to the village to return the package. The oldest is a church warden’s bill from 1758 – for “4 times washen the linin”  he was owed 10 shillings!

– the file of information about village buildings – including all our listed buildings and research on the Figg family and the Moleceys.

Late 19thC school group

West Deeping School pupils in the late 19th century when Mr Mann was the schoolmaster

 – archives for the village school –  from when it was first endowed by Miss Molecey in 1845 and opened in the stone cottages on King Street near the Red Lion. When the new West Deeping Church of England school opened in 1900, the original building became the Reading Room and later was converted into a family home. Most of the school records are at Lincolnshire Archives but we have copies which have been transcribed.  The log book was kept right up to the school’s closure in 1972.

 

– the Archaeology archive, including aerial photographs, maps and photographs of excavations at Rectory Farm starting in the 1990s and copies of talks given to West Deeping Heritage Group by the archaeologists.

and last but by no means least:

–  the “Boaty Archive” – many of the information resources we collected for the Heritage Lottery-funded project on the Stamford Canal.

If there are other aspects of West Deeping’s history in which you are interested or if you have information to share, please get in touch by commenting on this post.

The Tennyson’s Arms – one of West Deeping’s three pubs

West Deeping’s pub, the Red Lion, is well-known; but fewer people remember the George and Dragon and even fewer have heard of the Tennyson’s Arms!

The building is no longer there – it was demolished in the 1940s – and on the site, at the north end of King Street, are now two pairs of semi-detached bungalows built by the council not long after the end of World War 2.

With the help of  various archival resources, but mainly thanks to the memories and photographs of Bernard Roffe, who was brought up at the Tennyson’s Arms, we can piece together some of its history.

Cropped to print

The Tennyson’s Arms, West Deeping – painted by Karl Wood in 1939                                       Courtesy of the Usher Gallery, Lincoln

The Tennyson’s Arms  is the first one to be written up since the page Village Buildings 
was launched.  Follow the link to read the whole article.
Any further information about the Tennyson’s Arms would be welcome from readers.

Midsummer Heritage opportunities

It’s “Midsummer Magic” in West Deeping from 17th to 25th June – and it’s a great opportunity to get to see some of our fascinating village heritage.

Starting with the weekend of 17th to 18th June, there will be fifteen village gardens open to the public.  All of them have history attached and five of them incorporate parts of the former Welland Navigation or Stamford Canal which cannot normally be seen.

In the following week, there will be two Midsummer Heritage Walks – on Wednesday 21st June along part of the route of the canal and on Saturday 24th June, following the “Figg trail”!

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Fun and games in West Deeping – past and present!

Past: from the 1960s until 2009, a highlight of the week for some West Deeping residents and visitors from neighbouring villages was the Evergreen Club’s meeting every Tuesday afternoon.

Their annual scrapbooks (kept from 1973 to 1985) bring on waves of nostalgia for those of us who are old enough!

One of their members would send a report of the meeting to the Stamford Mercury each week. Very often it would start with:  “The usual table games were played …”. Whist drives and games of rummy, dominoes and scrabble brought out the competitive spirit in this group of over 60s, most of whom have now passed on.  Every so often, there was  “Prize bingo”  and every week without fail there was a raffle – to raise funds for good causes, members’ birthday parties, outings and celebratory lunches.

These are just two of the photographs we have of members of the Evergreen Club –  at a Christmas concert (we’re not sure where) and on a club outing, (perhaps to Sandringham, with the rhododendrons in the background?). We don’t know the dates but we do know a few of the names – Mr and Mrs Fisher, Mrs Goodliffe, Mr and Mrs Neale, Mrs Griffin, Mrs Shipp and Mrs Walker – for example.  If anyone has more photographs or recognises parents or grandparents, please get in touch!

Present: on a Sunday afternoon in February 2017, we had a go at re-creating the fun and games that used to go on in the Village Hall, for all ages  – with a Beetle Drive and Vintage tea to follow.

“Beetle drives” were particularly popular during the 1950s and 60s as fund-raising events. Many of us will remember, as children, playing the game of Beetle at family parties – our frustration at not getting a six on the dice before we could draw the body and collect the wings and legs; our hasty efforts at drawing a recognisable beetle with a blunt pencil!

It was just the same on Sunday: the noise levels got higher with the furious throwing of dice, the groans as people got the wrong number yet again and the cheers when they successfully got the number they needed – then the yell of “Beetle” and everyone stopped and counted up their score. The final winner was one of our most senior citizens, Myrtle Cummings and the runners-up were the youngest there, Emma and James.

After all the fun and games, everyone was ready for their vintage tea – no-one took photos until it was too late and there was nothing left of Annie’s sandwiches (crusts cut off, of course) Gill’s cream scones, Maggie’s filled bridge rolls and the cakes donated by several home bakers .

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We had a raffle, of course, which raised over £100 for the village’s Jubilee Fund , set up in 2002 to fund events like the Jubilee celebrations and village fetes and pay for village amenities like the bench and daffodils in the Tinsley Field.

May the village fun and games continue!

An Evening at the Granary

The granary was once part of Molecey’s Mill, on Stamford Road between West Deeping and Market Deeping. It is one of West Deeping’s National Heritage listed sites.

Graham Magee and Glenn Fuller are the most recent owners of the Granary and have completed an extensive refurbishment during which they found very interesting clues as to its history. They invited the Heritage group to the Granary on Wednesday 7 September to share their findings.

We were treated to a fascinating talk by Graham in which he covered the history of the Granary and the discoveries they made during the renovation. You can find details in the presentation slides the-granary-a-history. After the presentation we  explored the Granary to see the historical findings and much admired the beautiful refurbishment.

The evening was a resounding success. A large number of people attended and were treated to refreshments on the lawn before and after the presentation, on what was a perfect summer’s evening.

We thank Graham and Glenn for their wonderful hospitality and a most informative evening.

“Site meeting” at The Granary

A scrap of wallpaper, a grain chute, a handful of dried beans …

Recent finds at The Granary, one of West Deeping’s National Heritage listed sites, might be considered as only minor details but for the owners they have helped to bring to life the building’s history and its previous occupants.

The Granary was once part of the watermill known as Molecey’s Mill, on Stamford Road between West Deeping and Market Deeping. The history of the site is closely linked with its position alongside one of  12 locks on the former canal between Stamford and the Deepings. On the same site was West Deeping Toll Bar Cottage, where tolls were collected for the Deeping and Morcott Turnpike road.

 

Now a separate building from the watermill, the granary has been extensively refurbished by the most recent owners. Their attention to architectural and constructional detail has ensured that every clue they found as to the granary’s history was noted and investigated.

Rather than sitting in the Village Hall to hear a talk, we’re going “on site”. West Deeping Heritage Group’s first meeting of the autumn season will be hosted by Graham Magee, who will talk about the history of Molecey’s Mill  and take us on a guided tour of the Granary.

Everyone is welcome

Come and join us on Wednesday 7th September 2016

The Granary, Stamford Rd, West Deeping, Peterborough PE6 9JD

  • Refreshments will be served as usual from 7 p.m.
  • The talk & tour will start at 7.30 p.m.
  • Admission £2.50.
  • If you wish to walk over the fields from West Deeping, allow 20 minutes. There will be a number of cars to provide lifts back to the village afterwards.
  • There is plenty of parking. Turn off the A1175 (Stamford Road) at The Granary (not The Water Mill), over the bridge and through the gates, then turn left for the car parking area.

 

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